Goods Creek Fish Passage


Shasta-Trinity National Forest


Project Location: Goods Creek in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest.

Link to the location of the remediated barrier in the CDFW Map Viewer (BIOS): https://map.dfg.ca.gov/bios/?al=ds69&col=pad_id&val=707765

Passage Assessment Database ID: 707765


Project Description: The purpose of this project was to eliminate a fish barrier in Goods Creek by replacing the culvert with a bridge.

 


Pre-project conditions/barriers/challenges/background: The culvert generated a concentrated discharge resulting in a water velocity too high to pass fish during winter and storm flow events. This created an outlet plunge pool too difficult to gain access to during lower flows. The new crossing was designed to accommodate a 100-year storm event, and the project meets the objective of eliminating the potential for a catastrophic culvert failure. The culvert was undersized and the site had a history of overtopping.

 


Project actions/deliverables: The existing 9 ft. diameter, 71-foot long corrugated steel culvert was removed and replaced with a 24-ft. wide, 93-ft. long pre-stressed concrete girder bridge. Approximately 2,500 cubic yards of fill material were excavated and compacted on the adjacent road bed.  About 1,000 cubic yards of Class 5 rip rap was placed around the abutments for slope protection.

 


Fish benefits/ecological value (ie., species affected): A return to a naturally occurring stream bottom will comprise the substrate of the crossing and be allowed to exist at its natural grade. This will once again allow for fish and amphibian passage for all life stages at a wide range of stream flows. The bridge also eliminates the repeated deliveries of road based sediment from flooding, plus the recurring costs of reconstruction. The end-product should prove to be relatively maintenance free well into the future. Species affected include ESA-listed coho salmon and USFS Sensitive Klamath Mt. Province steelhead. Three miles of coho salmon ESA-designated Critical Habitat will be made available.
 

Other benefits: Overtopping or culvert failure would cause hundreds of cubic yards of road fill material to be mobilized downstream - replacement of the culvert with a bridge removed that threat.

 


Amount of habitat made available as a result of project implementation: Three miles of anadromous fish habitat were made accessible.


Habitat quality and type characterization: Immediately upstream (i.e., 20 feet) of the project area, is the confluence of Goods and South Fork Goods Creek. The mainsteam of Goods Creek is a response channel (i.e., slope less than 3%) and has several active beaver dams. Channel constriction and beaver dams above the old culvert caused sustantial stream aggradation. The stream channel is braided and encompasses about 0.3 acres. There are several side channels as well as thick willow growth.

 


Downstream of the project site, Goods Creek is a transport channel (i.e., slope is less than 3%) and is confined by steep upper banks. The Goods Creekstream channel is generally stable, and bedrock crops out in the channel bottom and lower banks. Directly below the culvert outlet is a wier that spans the bank full channel width and creates a large pool (see figure to the right).

 


The lower reach of Goods Creek has been modified by Highway 36. The 1944 aerial photos were used (i.e., pre-road) to better understand the natural condition of Goods Creek at the 29N28 road crossing. The aerial photos show that his reach used to meander across a braided flat valley. The original valley was about 1.4 acres and was located along highway 36. The valley area has been reduced to 0.3 acres since road construction, as indicated above.
 

Challenges/lessons learned: Although most of the post-project peer review was positive, there were concerns about the extensive headward bank and bed cutting. One individual believed this material should have been excavated and stabilized during the initial project implementation. The magnitudes of the changes were identified pre-project in a scour analysis that closely depicts the results we are seeing.

 


Easy access to the upstream adjustment area could be accomplished in a phase II project that would accelerate bank recovery by reshaping and stabilizing bed and banks. That would also reduce sedimentation downstream.


Project partners: None.


Project cost: $509.3 million


Funding sources: US Forest Service


Project start date: 2005


Project end date: Spring 2007


Monitoring and evaluation: The existing channel upstream from the project site is actively adjusting to gravel deposited during the last large flood (i.e., 1997), and there is active incision. Based on the deposits and flood indicators, it seems that SF Goods Creek is yielding the majority of the bed material. Refer to "Challenges/Lessons Learned."


Initial performance standards and goals: The purpose of this project was to eliminate the existing fish barrier in Goods Creek by replacing the culvert with a bridge. The old culvert was undersized and had a history of overtopping. The culvert created water velocity too high to pass fish during winter and storm flow events, and an outlet plunge pool was difficult to access during lower flows. The new crossing was designed to accommodate a100-year storm event and to eliminate the potential for a catastrophic culvert failure. About 1,000 cubic yards of Class 5 rip rap was placed around the abutments for slope protection.


Did the project make a difference, and if so, how?

  • Three miles of habitat became available for ESA-listed coho salmon and USFS Sensitive Klamath Mt. Province steelhead, while also creating three miles of coho salmon Critical Habitat. Resident rainbow trout benefit as well.
  • The project also included excavation of about 2,500 cubic yards of fill material and eliminated the potential road fill material that could have been mobilized with crossing failure.

Goods Creek